The New Disruptors podcast with Glenn Fleishman

Glenn invited Alli and I on a podcast to talk about how XOXO inspired us, how we got to San Francisco, playing Cards Against Humanity with Glenn, App.net and how we manage a full time job with our various side projects. Whew, we talk alot. Listen here: The Labors of Job with Alli Dryer and Jenni Leder (Episode 50)

Continue reading →

10 Steps to Prototyping with POP

Over the years I’ve spent a not inconsiderable amount of time helping to choreograph enormous, complicated, expensive systems so that specific groups of human beings can derive benefit from them. And whether the end product of those efforts was a multistory building or an app running on a mobile device, one of the best ways to figure out how all the parts and pieces should fit together has been to build a tiny, simple, cheap …

Continue reading →

Keepin’ It Lean

I work in mobile app development. We’ve been trying the “lean” approach to projects, where everyone is more involved from the beginning which is great ’cause everyone is clear on where we are in the project. There’s also not as much documentation, which can slow everyone down. You can read up on it here and here, they can explain it better than I can. In a previous life, we were doing what people like to …

Continue reading →

UI Bits: iOS transition effect in slow motion

I’d love to see the research that went into when how fast some items would go and when others should appear. iOS transition effect in slow motion from Lim Chee Aun on Vimeo. This is screen-recorded using Quicktime Player. Protip: This uses the ‘Toggle Slow Animations’ option in the iPhone Simulator, under the Debug menu. **Edit** A friend, just showed me this article, “A closer look at iPhone transition animations” with more in-depth thoughts behind …

Continue reading →

UI Bits: Start Alarm Clock by Tack

Start is a flat ui, gestured based alarm clock and stopwatch app by Tack Mobile. Right now you can’t wake up to music, but I think they are planning on it in the future. Right now you can wake up to various sounds provided in the app and then set the app to open another app (Rdio, Path, Facebook, etc), once the alarm has gone off. The app boasts a slick & flat-ish UI, something …

Continue reading →

Air Display : Turning your iPad into a second monitor

One of the most frustrating things for me is working without my large 27″ cinema display that I’ve grown so accustom to. I press my face right up to the screen to move things pixel by pixel. When I’m traveling or just feel like getting away from my desk for a bit, my working screen space decreases to a really sad state of my 15″ laptop with my tools taking up 30-40% of the area. …

Continue reading →

The Joy of Iteration

Like wine, whiskey, and celebrities with access to skilled plastic surgeons, software improves over time. Typically, the goal is to build a product with a limited set of features that solves a specific problem as quickly as possible. After that, gradual improvements based on user feedback refine a rough, often hastily improvised software offering into something functional and delightful. Not a lot of other creative work proceeds in this manner; imagine if Monet had periodically …

Continue reading →

Choose Words Wisely

Novelists exhibit stamina, poets profit from a sense of rhythm, journalists exploit facts, and bloggers benefit from prolificacy. And yesterday, as I mud wrestled with a single line of descriptive text within an app for fifteen frustrating minutes, I realized that writing for mobile interaction involves an entirely disparate set of skills. When I say “writing for mobile interaction,” I mean the text in an app that relates to the user interface: labels, title text, …

Continue reading →

A Good Idea

My cranium feels like an ancient stone belfry sometimes, in that ideas are flapping around inside it like semi-blind bats, bumping up against each other awkwardly in the darkness and emitting high-pitched squealing sounds. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed with divers notions, schemes, plans, and goals; to find myself unable to take any action because there are so many possible actions to take. And compounding the difficulty, there’s the fact that it’s often hard to …

Continue reading →

On Condition of Anonymity

‚ÄčIn 1776, an American writer published a radical pamphlet arguing for freedom from the oppression of British rule titled “Common Sense.” The author, Thomas Paine, published his incendiary and wildly popular 48-page document anonymously (primarily because it included vast amounts of highly persuasive treason). There were other reasons, of course: “As my wish was to serve an oppressed people, and assist in a just and good cause, I conceived that the honor of it would …

Continue reading →